HEADSHOT (2011)
Headshot is a very cool Thai arthouse thriller about an ex-cop turned hitman who literally sees the world upside down after being shot in the head. Its high-concept plot makes it feel very similar to Christopher Nolan’s work, particularly Memento. The cinematography is excellent, there are plenty of amazing upside-down POV shots and in particular there’s an amazing final shootout sequence set in a rainy forest at night. The screenplay is also great. The story frequently cross-cuts between the main character’s former life as a cop and his present day world of being a hitman. It feels like Infernal Affairs, where the audience simultaneously gets to experience both the good and bad side of the law, only this time it’s the same character who drastically switches sides. The film is written and directed by acclaimed Thai filmmaker Pen-ek Ratanaruang and this is the first film I’ve seen by him. The film uses a voiceover narration from the main character, and like Wong Kar-wai’s films, it’s always intellectually stimulating and poetic. The final scene of the film is beautiful and struck me with tears. As the credits rolled a giant wave of enlightening emotion came over me. I’m very fortunate that I was able to experience Headshot, the San Diego Asian Film Foundation hosted its west coast premiere, but outside of last night I don’t know if and when it’ll be available for others to see. The DVD was released in Thailand, but without English subtitles. Everyone else will have to wait for fan-translated subs instead. Headshot, like Drive and Miss Bala, executes its high-concept plot with striking artistry. I’ve never seen any other film play with an upside-down perspective like this, it’s brilliant and definitely worth seeing.

HEADSHOT (2011)

Headshot is a very cool Thai arthouse thriller about an ex-cop turned hitman who literally sees the world upside down after being shot in the head. Its high-concept plot makes it feel very similar to Christopher Nolan’s work, particularly Memento. The cinematography is excellent, there are plenty of amazing upside-down POV shots and in particular there’s an amazing final shootout sequence set in a rainy forest at night. The screenplay is also great. The story frequently cross-cuts between the main character’s former life as a cop and his present day world of being a hitman. It feels like Infernal Affairs, where the audience simultaneously gets to experience both the good and bad side of the law, only this time it’s the same character who drastically switches sides. The film is written and directed by acclaimed Thai filmmaker Pen-ek Ratanaruang and this is the first film I’ve seen by him. The film uses a voiceover narration from the main character, and like Wong Kar-wai’s films, it’s always intellectually stimulating and poetic. The final scene of the film is beautiful and struck me with tears. As the credits rolled a giant wave of enlightening emotion came over me. I’m very fortunate that I was able to experience Headshot, the San Diego Asian Film Foundation hosted its west coast premiere, but outside of last night I don’t know if and when it’ll be available for others to see. The DVD was released in Thailand, but without English subtitles. Everyone else will have to wait for fan-translated subs instead. Headshot, like Drive and Miss Bala, executes its high-concept plot with striking artistry. I’ve never seen any other film play with an upside-down perspective like this, it’s brilliant and definitely worth seeing.